Practicing Sleep Habits


Everyone is busy. We are busy doing all sorts of things: working, cleaning, gardening, studying, exercising, reading, watching TV, listening to music. In fact, when we are occupied, we are busy doing whatever is occupying us, even if this is lying on the sofa; ‘I am busy lying on the sofa’. So it is a given that we are all busy, even if someone else deems us to be doing nothing, because I am still busy; busy doing nothing. When I am asked if I am busy, I always think about how to answer because in essence it is like being asked whether you are breathing. We are always breathing, we are always occupied with something.
Naturally, some occupations require more energy that others. The exertion of exercise or the concentration upon a piece of work would be deemed effortful, utilising our finite energy resource that is built from our intake of nutrients and rest, including sleep. Good sleep is fundamental for health so it seems — we know what it feels like the day after a bad night’s sleep. Building up our energy reservoir is important for engaging effectively with life: moving, thinking, focus, performance, communication. What fills our consciousness is impacted upon by how much energy we have in that moment. Tiredness tends to cause our attentions to drift towards the negative. How do children react when they are tired? Adults are not necessarily very different!
Sleeping well does not come easily to many people. Crafting a good sleep habit takes time and perseverance, and not just on the way to bed, through the day. With so many people suffering the effects of stress, which switches their biology to survive instead of thrive, night time continues to be a period of alertness, on the lookout for danger. Of course there is no danger, except thoughts that pass through the embodied mind as past is re-lived and future anticipated. Being present is the antidote, and there are simple practices to achieve this (next blog: simple skills).
Sleeping at night is not the only time we need to refresh and renew. We also benefit from regular bouts of relaxation during the day that allow us to recharge. Recharging underpins performance, as to perform optimally we must engage and focus, which we can only maximise if we have energy. Every 90 minutes, taking a break and refreshing with simple practices is a good start point, diarising if necessary. Additionally, each day a period of 10-20 minutes of deeper relaxation is important. Some people will have a longer bout of rest between 12pm and 3pm — the siesta is a great idea. You may be thinking that you don’t have time for all this rest, however, the gains in energy allow you to perform with greater efficiency. Multi-tasking is a red herring; it simply means we are doing several things without our full focus. In summary, without refreshing and renewing, energy levels dwindle and performance fades so in fact we cannot afford not to factor this into our day.
Athletes periodise their training. This is a habit we can adopt day to day to optimise performance as individuals: e.g./ work, relationships, activities, communication. It is easy creating a new habit. It just needs practice. So, be busy, but make sure you have enough energy.
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