Many people feel tired or run-down at some point during the day. A lack of energy could affect your daily activities and make you less productive.
The fact is that the type and quantity of food you eat play an essential role in determining your energy levels during the day.
Even though all foods give you energy, some foods contain nutrients that could help increase your energy levels and maintain your alertness and focus throughout the day.
Here is a list of foods that have been proven to help promote energy levels:
Bananas may be one of the best foods for energy. They are an excellent source of carbohydrates, potassium and vitamin B6, all of which can help boost energy levels in your body (12).
One study showed that eating a banana before a 75-km cycling trial was as efficient as a carbohydrate drink for improving the performance of endurance athletes (1).
Additionally, bananas could provide a decent amount of tyrosine, an amino acid your body uses to produce dopamine and norephedrine. These hormones have been proven to improve mental performance and reduce fatigue (34).

Fatty fish like salmon and tuna are good sources of protein, fatty acids and B vitamins, making them great foods to include in your diet.
A serving of salmon or tuna provides you with the recommended daily amount of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 (56).
Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce inflammation in the body, which is a common cause of fatigue (7).
In fact, some studies determined that taking omega-3 supplements could decrease fatigue, especially in cancer patients and those recovering from cancer (89).
Furthermore, vitamin B12 works together with folic acid to produce red blood cells and help iron work better in the body. Optimal levels of red blood cells and iron in the blood can reduce fatigue and increase energy (10).

Brown rice is a very nutritious food. Unlike white rice, it is less processed and retains more nutritional value in the form of fiber, vitamins and minerals.
One cup (195 grams) of cooked brown rice contains 3.5 grams of fiber and provides about 88% of the RDI for manganese, a mineral that helps your enzymes break down carbohydrates and proteins to generate energy (1112).
Additionally, thanks to its fiber content, brown rice has a low glycemic index. Therefore, it could help regulate blood sugar levels and help you maintain steady energy levels throughout the day (13).

Besides being delicious, sweet potatoes are a nutritious source of energy for those looking for an extra boost.
One medium-sized sweet potato could pack up to 23 grams of carbohydrates, 3.8 grams of fiber, 28% of the RDI for manganese and a whopping 438% of the RDI for vitamin A (14).
Thanks to sweet potatoes’ fiber content and complex carbs, your body digests them at a slow pace, which provides you with a steady supply of energy (15).
Sweet potatoes are also a great source of manganese, which helps in the breakdown of nutrients to produce energy (12).

Coffee might be the first food you’d think to consume when you’re looking for a boost of energy.
It’s rich in caffeine. This compound can quickly pass from your bloodstream to your brain and inhibit the activity of adenosine, a neurotransmitter that quiets the central nervous system (16).
In consequence, the production of epinephrine increases. This hormone stimulates the body and brain (17).
Even though coffee only provides two calories per cup, its stimulatory effects on the body can make you feel alert and focused (18).

Eggs are not only a tremendously satisfying food, but they can also provide energy to fuel your day.
Eggs are packed with protein, which can give you a steady and sustained source of energy because it does not cause spikes in blood sugar and insulin when it is digested (19).
Additionally, leucine is the most abundant amino acid in eggs, and is known to stimulate energy production in several ways (20).
Leucine can help cells take in more blood sugar, stimulate the production of energy in the cells and increase the breakdown of fat to produce energy (21).
Moreover, eggs are rich in B vitamins. These vitamins help enzymes perform their role in the processes of breaking down food for energy (202223).

Apples are one of the most popular fruits in the world, and are a good source of carbs and fiber.
A medium-sized apple (185 grams) contains about 5 grams of carbs, 19 grams of sugar and up to 4 grams of fiber (24).
Due to their rich content of natural sugars and fiber, apples can provide a slow and sustained energy release (25).
Furthermore, apples have a high antioxidant content. Research has shown that antioxidants could slow down the digestion of carbohydrates, so they release energy over a more extended period of time (26).
Lastly, it is recommended to eat apples whole. Juices and purees, from which fiber is removed, are ingested faster and can only provide you with quickly digested energy (27).

Water is essential for life. It represents up to 60% of your body weight and is involved in many cellular functions, including energy production (28).
Not drinking enough water may lead to dehydration, which can slow down body functions, leaving you feeling sluggish and tired (2829).
Drinking water could give you a boost of energy and help fight off feelings of fatigue (28).
You can avoid dehydration by drinking water even if you are not thirsty. Try to drink water regularly throughout the day.

Dark chocolate has a higher cocoa content than regular or milk chocolate.
The antioxidants in cocoa have been shown to have many health benefits, such as increasing blood flow throughout the body (30).
This effect helps the delivery of oxygen to the brain and muscles, which improves their functions. This can be especially helpful during exercise (313233).
Additionally, the increase of blood flow produced by antioxidants in cocoa could help reduce mental fatigue and improve mood (34).
Dark chocolate also contains stimulatory compounds such as theobromine and caffeine, which have been shown to enhance mental energy and mood (35).

Yerba maté is a drink made from the dried leaves of a plant native to South America. It has been shown to have many health benefits (36).
Yerba maté contains antioxidants and caffeine. A regular 8-ounce cup can offer about 85 mg of caffeine, which is similar to the amount in a small cup of coffee (36).
The caffeine in yerba maté promotes the production of the hormone epinephrine, which increases energy. However, unlike other stimulants, yerba maté does not seem to affect blood pressure or heart rate (37).
Animal and human research has suggested that yerba maté may enhance mental focus, memory, mood and even physical activity (383940).

Goji berries have been used in Chinese medicine for centuries due to their multiple benefits.
Besides being packed with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, this fruit is known to be a good source of fiber (4142).
Research has suggested that goji berry juice could provide antioxidant protection, assist with mental performance and alertness, and help decrease feelings of fatigue (434445).
Additionally, goji berries are rich in fiber. A one-ounce serving (28 grams) provides 2 grams of fiber. This could help slow down digestion and release energy slowly (1541).
Goji berries are easy to enjoy mixed in yogurt, smoothies, baked goods and sauces. Or you can simply eat them raw.

Quinoa is a seed popular for its high protein content.
One cup of quinoa provides 39 grams of carbs, 5 grams of dietary fiber, 8 grams of protein and a significant amount of vitamins and minerals (46).
Even though this superfood is high in carbohydrates, it has a low glycemic index, which indicates that its carbs are absorbed slowly and can provide sustained energy release (4748).
Additionally, quinoa provides more than 20% of the RDI for manganese, magnesium and folate. All of these nutrients are used by enzymes in the process of producing energy (124950).

Oatmeal is a whole-grain cereal that could provide you with long-lasting energy.
It contains beta-glucan, a soluble fiber that forms a thick gel when combined with water. The presence of this gel in the digestive system delays stomach emptying and the absorption of glucose into the blood (5152).
Furthermore, oats are rich in vitamins and minerals that help the energy production process. These include B vitamins, iron and manganese (122251).
The combination of all these nutrients makes oatmeal a perfect food for sustained energy release.

Yogurt is an excellent snack to fuel up your day because it is a rich source of carbohydrates and protein.
The carbs in plain yogurt are mainly in the form of simple sugars, such as lactose and galactose. When broken down, these sugars can provide ready-to-use energy (53).
Additionally, yogurt is packed with protein, which helps slow down the digestion of carbohydrates, thereby slowing down the release of sugars into the blood (54).
Moreover, yogurt contains great amounts of vitamins B2 and B12, which are involved in cellular functions. They aid the formation of the molecule ATP, which your cells use for fuel (2253).

Hummus is made with chickpeas, sesame seed paste, oil and lemon. The combination of these ingredients makes hummus a good source of energy (55).
Chickpeas in hummus are a good source of complex carbs and fiber that the body uses for steady energy (1556).
In addition, sesame seed paste and oil in hummus contain healthy fats that can be stored and used as another source of energy. These ingredients are also helpful at slowing down the absorption of carbs, which helps you avoid blood sugar spikes (5758).
You can enjoy hummus as a dip for veggies or in combination with other dishes such as sandwiches or salads.

Edamame can be an easy and satisfying pick-me-up snack.
It is relatively low in calories, but offers significant amounts of protein, carbs and fiber. Just one cup of edamame can pack up to 17 grams of protein, 16 grams of carbs and about 8 grams of fiber (59).
Additionally, it has high amounts of vitamins and minerals that can help increase energy in different ways. One cup of edamame provides 79% of the RDI for manganese and 121% of the RDI for folic acid (59).
Folic acid works with iron to promote energy and fight off fatigue and anemia, while manganese helps generate energy from the breakdown of carbs and protein (1260).
Lastly, edamame contains great amounts of molybdenum, which acts as a stimulus for enzymes and assists in the breakdown of nutrients to use as energy (61).

Besides being a great and inexpensive source of protein, lentils are a good source of nutrients and help boost energy levels.
Lentils are legumes that are rich in carbs and fiber. One cup of cooked lentils provides up to 40 grams of carbs and about 16 grams of fiber (62).
The fiber in lentils promotes slow stomach emptying and more controlled increases in blood sugar levels. Therefore, you will not only feel full for longer after you eat them, but you can also expect steady energy levels (63).
Additionally, lentils can increase your energy levels by replenishing your stores of folate, manganese, zinc and iron. These nutrients assist in the effective production of energy in cells and breakdown of nutrients for the release of energy (12606465).

Avocados are considered to be a superfood because of all their significant health benefits.
For example, they’re rich in healthy fats and fiber. About 84% of the healthy fats in avocados come from monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (66).
These healthy fats have been shown to promote optimal blood fat levels and enhance the absorption of nutrients. They can also be stored in the body and used as energy sources (6667).
Additionally, the fiber in avocados accounts for 80% of their carbohydrate content, which can help maintain steady energy levels (66).
Furthermore, avocados are a good source of B vitamins, which are required for the optimal function of the mitochondria in your cells, where cellular energy is produced (2268).

Oranges are famous for their high vitamin C content. One orange can provide as much as 106% of the RDI for vitamin C (69).
Additionally, oranges contain antioxidant compounds that can provide protection from oxidative stress (70).
Research has shown that oxidative stress could promote feelings of fatigue. Therefore, the antioxidant protection provided by compounds in oranges may be able to help decrease fatigue (7071).
In fact, one study showed that 13 women who consumed 17 ounces (500 ml) of orange juice and did one hour of aerobic training three times a week for three months saw decreases in muscle fatigue and experienced improvements in physical performance (72).

Strawberries are another good energy-boosting fruit.
They can provide you with carbs, fiber and sugars that can enhance energy levels. One cup of strawberries provides 12 grams of carbs, 3 grams of fiber and 7 grams of sugar (73).
Additionally, this same portion will give you 149% of the RDI for vitamin C (73).
Besides helping fight inflammation in the body, the antioxidants in strawberries may help fight fatigue and give you energy (717475).
You can incorporate strawberries in many recipes, and use them in smoothies, parfaits or salads.

Seeds, such as chia seeds, flaxseeds and pumpkin seeds, could also increase your energy levels.
These seeds are generally high in plant-based omega-3 fatty acids. Low levels of omega-3 fatty acids have been linked to increased inflammation and fatigue (87677).
Fatty acids are also an important source of stored energy and help your cells function properly (6778).
Moreover, seeds are a good source of fiber and protein. The fiber in seeds contributes to the slow digestion of the nutrients, resulting in a steady, sustained release of energy (798081).

Beans are rich in nutrients and a great source of natural energy.
Even though there are hundreds of different types of beans, their nutrient profiles are very similar. They are a rich source of carbohydrates, fiber and protein (82).
Beans are digested slowly, which helps maintain stable blood sugar levels and gives you steady energy. Additionally, beans contain antioxidants that can help fight inflammation and promote energy (83).
Black beans and black-eyed peas are among the most famous kinds of beans. These beans are good sources of folic acid, iron, manganese and magnesium, which are involved in energy production and help with the delivery of energy to every cell in the body (8485).

Green tea is famous for its long list of health benefits.
It has a high concentration of powerful antioxidants that can help prevent oxidative stress and inflammation (8687).
Similar to coffee, green tea contains caffeine, which can increase energy levels. However, green tea also contains a compound called L-theanine (8688).
L-theanine can moderate the effects of caffeine, such as anxiety and the jitters, and it produces a smoother boost of energy. Research has shown that the combination of caffeine and L-theanine in green tea can increase focus, alertness and mental concentration (868990).
Moreover, green tea can be a good energy booster for physical activity because it can decrease fatigue by increasing the breakdown of fat and the release of the hormone norepinephrine (9192).

Nuts can be a great snack packed with nutrients to promote energy.
Most nuts like almonds, walnuts and cashews are known for their high calories and abundance of proteins, carbs and healthy fats. These nutrients can provide you with a slow release of energy during the day (93).
They are also high in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and antioxidants that can increase energy levels and help with inflammation and antioxidant protection (89495).
Additionally, these nuts provide decent amounts of carbs and fiber for a steady and sustained energy boost (96).
Nuts also contain other vitamins and minerals, such as manganese, iron, B vitamins and vitamin E. These can help increase energy production and decrease tiredness (10122297).

Popcorn can be an excellent low-calorie, energizing snack.
It’s high in carbs and fiber, which can make it very satisfying and a good option for an energy-boosting snack (98).
A 100-gram serving of air-popped popcorn provides 78 grams of carbs and a whopping 15 grams of fiber, which makes popcorn one of the highest-fiber foods there is. Therefore, it could provide a steady release of energy (99).
Popcorn can be a healthy food when it’s cooked with wholesome ingredients using the air-pop cooking method.

Leafy green vegetables, such as spinach and kale, are excellent sources of nutrients that promote energy.
They are high in iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium and vitamins A, C, E and K. Additionally, they are packed with folic acid, fiber and antioxidants that provide health benefits (100).
Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of iron deficiency (10).
Leafy green vegetables like spinach and kale are excellent sources of iron to replenish your body's stores, and of vitamin C to enhance the absorption of iron in the body (101).
Iron enhances the production of red blood cells for the efficient delivery of oxygen to your cells, which is known to fight fatigue (10).
Furthermore, leafy green vegetables may also enhance the formation of the hormone nitric oxide. It helps the blood vessels widen for better blood flow through the body (102103).

Beets have gained popularity recently due to their ability to improve energy and stamina.
Studies have shown that beetroot may be able to improve blood flow due to its antioxidant content and naturally occurring nitrates (103104).
As with leafy green vegetables, nitrates are compounds that help increase nitric oxide and improve blood flow throughout the body, allowing more oxygen delivery to tissues. This has the ability to increase energy levels, especially for athletic performance (103).
Additionally, beets are packed with carbs, fiber and sugar for a sustained energy boost.
One cup of beets (136 grams) could provide up to 3.8 grams of fiber and 9.2 grams of natural sugars (105).

There is an abundant variety of foods that can help boost your energy.
Whether they are packed with carbs for readily available energy, or fiber and protein for a slower release of energy, these foods can help increase your power and stamina.
Additionally, many of these foods also contain significant amounts of other nutrients, including vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.
All of these compounds have been shown to be involved in the production of energy within your cells, and they all provide many other health benefits.
If you want more energy, incorporating these foods into your diet is a great place to start.
An evidence-based nutrition article from our experts at Authority Nutrition.

Key Points
Introduction
Health care professionals get these all the time: “Should I put ice on this or heat?” “What’s better for a sprained ankle – hot or cold?” “My back is sore. What should I put on it?”
If this is the kind of question you find yourself asking then you’ve found the blog post to help offer you the appropriate answers. As a health care provider, this has to be one of the top questions I get so I decided to answer these age-old questions for you one and for all – right here!
In part 1 I am going to explain to you how temperature affects your body. In part two we describe heat therapy versus cold therapy specifically. Then to wrap up,  in part 3 I have broken things down into specific scenarios and the types of treatment that would work best in each.
So, let’s get things started ladies and gentlemen!

Part 1: Temperature and your body


First, let’s try to better understand the effect of temperature on the body. Humans are warm blooded mammals or at least most of us are! We have the ability to “thermoregulate” or regulate our body temperature through the power of a magical red fluid  also known as blood.
The human body likes to hang out at a natural temperature of around 37.5 degrees Celsius (to be exact)! As certain parts of our body change temperature, due to things like exercise and frigid outdoor temperatures, our body senses the change and send more or less blood to that part of the body in an attempt to naturally heat or cool it. When we’re hot, blood flow increases to our extremities in an to attempt to cool it by increasing heat loss through the skin. When we are cold the body does the exact opposite by decreasing blood flow to a region and thus reduce heat loss.
How does it do this you ask?
The body does this by increasing or decreasing the size of the blood vessels leading to that area and speeding up or slowing down the flow of blood to that area.
So why is this relevant to my injury or pain?
When we have a recent injury (i.e. “acute injury”) the body’s first response is to send blood to that area to help speed the healing process. Healing and clotting factors are needed to help reverse any damage that may be going on. When the body increases blood flow to an area in hopes of bringing the healing factors, it also heats the area. This  helps to relax the local tissues and helps to speed up and improve the healing process. Because of this heat, people can use something like ice on a hot and angry injury to cool the area. This helps to constrict the local blood vessels and slows down any potential swelling that may happen. You might be wondering, “Is swelling bad?”. Great question which we will be touching in on in a future post so stay tuned!

Part 2: Ice vs Heat


Let’s talk about “Ice, Ice baby”
For as long as most people can remember, tossing something cold on an injury has been the holy grail of treatments. “Your ankle hurts? Grab yourself a bag of frozen peas! You tripped on little Johny’s toy firetruck again? Go get some ice on that, stat!
Based on what we know about the body’s ability to thermoregulate, we can understand that if we use cold therapy over an injury it’s going to constrict the blood vessels in the area and direct blood away from it. If you have a hot or swollen joint, ice can be a great adjunct to help control inflammation and aid in the healing process.
Are you feeling “hot, hot, hot”?
Now that we know about what heat can do to the body, let’s talk about what adding a heat pack to your skin can do. Once you’ve added some heat on your body, we understand that it helps open up the blood vessels around the area. Your body senses the heat and thinks “hey, this isn’t 37.5 degrees celcius, so lets widen the blood vessels in an attempt to cool it down” – which helps to relax the tissues in the area. This can be great for a tight or stiff muscle but if you’ve got swelling in the area stay away from the heat!

Part 3: So When Do I Use Ice Vs Heat?


So, do I ice it or heat it?
This an interesting question … to keep it simple: if your injury is not hot, swollen or red either will actually work! Both heat and cold place a strong input onto the skin which the brain senses and feels. As a result, the use of treatment really comes down to your personal preference. Most people prefer the warm and soothing sensation of heat, but hey there are Dr. Freeze’s out there is well.
Inflammation and swelling of a fresh injury
Swelling brings healing factors to the area so we don’t want to completely diminish this process. As a general rule of thumb use cold therapy on an acute injury during the first 24-48 hours of treatment, but for no more than 10-15 minutes at at a time. The use of compression is often a helpful adjunct in this case.
Muscle tightness
If you have a tight muscle increasing blood flow to the area will have a relaxing effect on it. Now I know a tool that would work great for that. Don’t you? Heat! Apply heat to an area for 10-15 minutes  can really help to relax the muscles in the area and improve your movement.  Just remember to keep the temperature comfortable. Excessive heat doesn’t really speed things up or make them any better.
Stiffness
If you have a stiff muscle or joint we know that if we can find a way to increase the blood flow to the area we will have a relaxation effect over the area. Now I know a tool that would work great for that don’t you? Heat!
Now we have to be careful here because sometimes after an acute injury we can have swelling into joints and/or muscles areas which can also be perceived as stiffness. If this is the case, cold therapy would be your best bet. If you’re unsure check in with a health practitioner that your trust – e.g. doctor, nurse, massage therapist, physiotherapist.

Warning


As wonderful as cold and hot therapy can be it’s important to remember that any treatment used in the extreme can have adverse affects on the body.  For instance, both hot and cold can cause skin burns or tissue damage if you are extreme or excessive, so be careful! Ensure that the temperature of the modalities you are using are always comfortable and regularly check the area for signs of redness, changes in skin texture, or loss of  skin sensation.
Moreover, when you are modulating the blood flow of the body you are also modulating your heart rate. So keep an eye on this as well. If you have any concerns about this, follow-up with your family physician before proceeding.